Paranoia Politician Diva

Aug 28

witches rave - from the trash can demo tape/sketches outtakes compilation

Aug 8

John Fahey is the original underground musician. Dylan was still at Hibbing High School when John Fahey made his first record.
- Dr. Demento
Jun 29

John Fahey is the original underground musician. Dylan was still at Hibbing High School when John Fahey made his first record.

- Dr. Demento

Jun 29

John Fahey was an American fingerstyle guitarist and composer who pioneered the steel-string acoustic guitar as a solo instrument. His style has been greatly influential and has been described as the foundation of American Primitivism, a term borrowed from painting and referring mainly to the self-taught nature of the music and its minimalist style. Fahey borrowed from the folk and blues traditions in American roots music, having compiled many forgotten early recordings in these genres. He would later incorporate classical, Portuguese, Brazilian, and Indian music into his œuvre.”

Fahey began collecting records from a young age, coming across artists such as Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson and Charlie Patton. He also shared a vested interest in contemporary classical artists like Charles Ives and Bela Bartok. In his words:

"I had a big background in classical music [via recordings] … I started trying to
compose. I was playing the guitar but I heard an orchestra in my head. So, I
was really composing for full orchestra… I was trying to put together some
dissonant music … but played in the fingerpicking pattern which I still use
[prewar folk and blues]. So I was trying to put those two things together into a
coherent musical language which people would understand”

"The New Age people call it Folk; the Folk people call it New Age, but it is really neither. It’s transitional. The style is derived from the country blues and string band music of the ’20s and ’30s, however much of the music is contemporary. Fahey referred to it as ‘American Primitive’ after the ‘French Primitive’ painters, meaning untutored."

Fahey recorded and self-released his album Blind Joe Death on Takoma Records in 1959. Pressing only 100 copies “using money he earned pumping gas at a local station and a loan of $300 from an Episcopal minister”. This year the album was deemed by the Library of Congress to be “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important” and added to the United States National Recording Registry.

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In fact, I would go so far as to say that I am playing emotions and expressing them in a coherent public language called music.- John Fahey
Jun 27

In fact, I would go so far as to say that I am playing emotions and expressing them in a coherent public language called music.

- John Fahey

Jun 27

I’m in love with the prettiest thing

~ Otis Redding

Jun 27

At 63 years old and a lifetime of singing and entertaining, Charles Bradley made his CD debut - No Time For Dreaming. Released under Daptone Records and backed by the Menahan Street Band - who had released their own album Make the Road by Walkingin 2008. Bradley’s album is characteristic of Daptone’s “revivalist approach - celebrating the feel of funk and soul music from the 1960s and 1970s”. The backing band is a mix of fellow bands Antibalas Afrobeat Orchestra and The Budos Band among others. The video shows bassist Nick Movshon - who has also collaborated with bands like TV on the Radio and The Black Keys.

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My shows are planned and scripted only so far as it  allows me to lose the sense of where I am and get wrapped up in what I’m  doing. Every night, I want to get that feeling of being surprised by  what’s coming out.
~ Andrew Bird
Jun 26

My shows are planned and scripted only so far as it allows me to lose the sense of where I am and get wrapped up in what I’m doing. Every night, I want to get that feeling of being surprised by what’s coming out.

~ Andrew Bird

Jun 26

In 1997, multi-instrumentalist Andrew Bird released the album ‘Thrills' within his band Andrew Bird’s Bowl of Fire. Bird had earlier recorded the album ‘Music of Hair' - which primarily displayed his prowess on violin. From 1996 to 1998 he collaborated with Squirrel Nut Zippers - whose music has been described as an ‘eclectic fusion of Delta blues, gypsy jazz, 1930s-era swing, and klezmer.” Some associate this band with the early 90’s swing revival - spearheaded by the band Royal Crown Revue (who you may recognize from this scene in Jim Carrey's The Mask). “The gypsy-like music sounds authentic, and evokes the idea of folk in a far different way than that which Bob Dylan has popularized. This is folklore, twisting bits of bluegrass, eastern European, jazz, and even, seemingly, Jewish/Israeli folk songs into the mix. The gypsy theme ties everything together, but an errant guitar riff or a stand-up bass throw all predictability out the window. Furthermore, the music is consistently and intentionally tinged with a static that adds to the mystery and that “old time” feel.”
While all the music is stunning, perhaps the most succinct tracks are ‘Glass Figurine’, ‘Cock o’ the Walk’ and my favourite: ‘Some of These Days’ - which features a hidden medley to ‘Chinatown, My Chinatown - a so called jazz standard. The song - originally written in 1910 was featured in the 1987 film Radio Days by director Woody Allen.

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Grace is what matters. In anything. Especially life, especially growth,  tragedy, pain, love, death. About people, that’s what matters. That’s a  quality I admire very greatly. It keeps you from reaching for the gun  too quickly; it keeps you from destroying things too foolishly; it sort  of keeps you alive and keeps you open for more understanding.
~ Jeff Buckley
Jun 25

Grace is what matters. In anything. Especially life, especially growth, tragedy, pain, love, death. About people, that’s what matters. That’s a quality I admire very greatly. It keeps you from reaching for the gun too quickly; it keeps you from destroying things too foolishly; it sort of keeps you alive and keeps you open for more understanding.

~ Jeff Buckley